CCT: AIPS profile - W.Holup

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Wopo Holup
 
 
{The Tree of Life}  
The Tree of Life
concrete, bronze
north façade of the main building 
2000
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An immense evergreen tree, used since ancient times as a symbol of life, has taken root at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington this week. The Tree of Life, a hand-carved and cast sculpture by internationally noted artist, Wopo Holup, will climb to nearly 100 feet upon the north façade of the newly constructed wing of the Health Center’s Research builing.
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The Tree of Life is a two part sculptural project. The first part located at the Academic Entrance consists of bronze spheres, and the second part located at the Main Entrance is a bas-relief concrete and bronze image of a tree and Caduceus.

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The bas-relief image of a tree with an entwined Caduceus is located on the exterior of the North-facing wall of the Academic Research Building adjacent to the Main Entrance to the Health Center. The tree is 96’ high, and 24’ wide at the bottom diminishing to about 8’ wide at the top. The tree is made of cast concrete in 44 separate pieces.

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Tree of Life reflects the work performed within the medical facility, the tree will incorporate a 45-foot twining bronze caduceus, the symbol of physicians. Carefully integrated with architectural elements of the building, the artist’s embellishment thoughtfully enhances the architect’s design while conveying a message about the beauty of nature’s healing.

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The Caduceus is associated with the first physician, the Greek, Asclepius. The twin snakes, entwine themselves on the tree’s trunk rather than the traditional staff. The Caduceus is cast bronze with a light blue/green patina. It is approximately 12’ wide and 45’ in length.

 

 
{The Tree of Life (bronze spheres)} Bronze spheres
cast bronze
entrance to Academic Research building
2000
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In addition to the monumental wall relief, Wopo Holup has created a series of bronze spheres relating to issues of health and science, which rest on balustrades flanking the entrance to the Academic Research building.

At the Health Center’s academic entrance there are two balustrades flanking the entry doors.  The sculptural work Still Lift consists of ten spherical shapes relating to the issues of health and research.

Each spherical shape is about eight inches in diameter.  They are spheres from nature, more specifically those associate with scientific research: a multicellular volvox, a blastocel, and a model of the DNA double helix (8” x 8” x 36”).  There is also a sphere of the earth and one of an acorn.  These represent our undiscovered resources for healing and health. 

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Between the balustrades, on the concrete walkway are two sandblasted quotes:

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There are science and the applications of science, bound together as the fruit to the tree which bears it” by Louis Pasteur.

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The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking” by Albert Einstein.