DRS: PS 93(5.1), Real Estate Conveyance Tax Implications for Conversions of Partnerships to Limited Liability Companies

 

STATE OF CONNECTICUT
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE SERVICES

450 Columbus Blvd
Hartford CT 06103
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

PS 93(5.1)

Real Estate Conveyance Tax Implications for
Conversions of Partnerships to
Limited Liability Companies


PURPOSE: The purpose of this Policy Statement is to explain the treatment of a deed, instrument or writing from a partnership to a limited liability company that is considered to be a continuation thereof.


BACKGROUND: The Connecticut Limited Liability Act; Conn. Gen. Stat. 34-100 et seq; was enacted into law on June 23, 1993. The Limited Liability Act permits the formation in Connecticut of unincorporated associations that bear the corporation law characteristic of limited liability for all investors, with the possibility of being treated as partnerships for purposes of federal and state tax law. Passage of the act may lead partnerships to convert to limited liability companies. When a partnership that owns Connecticut real property converts to a limited liability company, a new deed may be recorded to reflect the proper ownership of the real property.


STATUTORY AUTHORITY: Conn. Gen. Stat. 34-100, et seq., and 12-494, et seq.


EFFECTIVE DATE: Effective upon issuance and applicable to all open periods.


REAL ESTATE CONVEYANCE TAX: Conn. Gen. Stat. 12-494(a) imposes the real estate conveyance tax on "each deed, instrument or writing, whereby any lands, tenements or other realty is granted, assigned, transferred or otherwise conveyed to, or vested in, the purchaser, or any other person by his direction, when the consideration for the interest or property conveyed equals or exceeds two thousand dollars . . . "


REAL ESTATE CONVEYANCE TAX IMPLICATIONS FOR CONVERSIONS OF GENERAL PARTNERSHIPS TO LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS: Where a general partnership that owned real property converted to a limited partnership, Ruling No. 91-3 held that where:

the limited partnership will be considered to be a continuing partnership within the meaning of 26 U.S.C. 708, any deed that is recorded to reflect the proper ownership of the real property (with the general partnership as the grantor and the limited partnership as the grantee) will not be subject to real estate conveyance taxes.

That ruling relied on the provisions of 26 C.F.R. 47.4383-1, a regulation promulgated under the federal Documentary Stamp Tax, on which the real estate conveyance tax is modeled. (See 1989 Conn. Op. Atty. Gen. 89-020.) That regulation provides in part:

No tax shall be imposed under section . . . 4361 by reason of any transfer of an interest in a partnership holding . . . realty if such partnership (or another partnership) is considered to be a continuing partnership within the meaning of section 708 and if such . . . realty [continues] to be held, regardless of the name in which held, by the continuing partnership (or continuing partnerships if more than one). For rules relating to continuations of partnerships, see section 708 and the regulations thereunder . . .

As explained in Ruling No. 91-3, under 26 U.S.C. section 708 a partnership is considered to be continuing if it is not terminated. A partnership is terminated if (1) no part of any business, financial operation, or venture of the partnership continues to be carried on by any of its partners in a partnership or (2) within a 12-month period there is a sale or exchange of 50 percent or more of the total interest in partnership capital and profits. Under 26 C.F.R. 1.708-1(b)(1)(ii), a contribution of property to a partnership does not constitute a sale or exchange for purposes of 26 U.S.C. 708. Ruling No. 91-3.

Ruling No. 91-3 also relied upon Rev. Rul. 84-52, 1984-1 C.B. 157, which considered the federal income tax consequences of the conversion of a general partnership into a limited partnership interest in the same partnership. Rev. Rul. 84-52 held that where partners amended the partnership agreement to convert a general partnership into a limited partnership under a statute corresponding in all material respects to the uniform limited partnership act and where each partner's percentage interest in the partnership's profits, loss and capital remained the same upon conversion, the partnership was considered to be continuing as long as the business of the general partnership continued to be carried on after the conversion by the limited partnership. Ruling No. 91-3 (citing Rev. Rul. 84-52).


REAL ESTATE CONVEYANCE TAX IMPLICATIONS FOR CONVERSIONS OF PARTNERSHIPS TO LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANIES: The Internal Revenue Service has addressed partnership continuity upon the conversion of a partnership to a limited liability company generally in Rev. Rul. 95-37, 1995-17 I.R.B. 10. Rev. Rul. 95-37 held that the federal income tax consequences described in Rev. Rul. 84-52 apply to the conversion of an interest in a domestic partnership into an interest in a domestic limited liability company that is classified as a partnership.

Therefore, where a general or limited partnership that owned real property converts to a limited liability company, the limited liability company will be considered to be a continuing partnership within the meaning of 26 U.S.C. 708, and any deed that is recorded to reflect the proper ownership of the real property (with the partnership as the grantor and the limited liability company as the grantee), will not be subject to real estate conveyance taxes. Additionally, where real property of the partnership is held in the name of its partners rather than the partnership, as is permitted by Conn. Gen. Stat. 34-46, and the partners are the grantors and the limited liability company is the grantee, any deed that is recorded to reflect the proper ownership of the real property will not be subject to real estate conveyance taxes.


EFFECT ON OTHER DOCUMENTS: This document modifies and supersedes PS 93(5).


EFFECT OF THIS DOCUMENT: A Policy Statement is a document that explains in depth a current department policy or practice affecting the liability of taxpayers. Unlike a Ruling, a Policy Statement does not apply a policy or practice to a specific set of facts but it may be referred to for general guidance by taxpayers. Unlike a Special Notice, it does not announce a new policy or practice in response to changes in state or federal laws or regulations or to judicial decisions.


PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING NEW INFORMATION ABOUT DRS.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: To order forms and publications or for further information, call the Department of Revenue Services at 860-297-5962 (Hartford area or out-of-state) or 1-800-382-9463 (in-state). Forms and publications may be ordered through voice-mail 24-hours a day by choosing Option 3 on your touch tone telephone.

Electronic Delivery Options: You can also obtain tax forms and publications 24-hours a day from our Web home page at http://www.ct.gov/drs. Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD/TT) users only call 860-297-4911 during business hours.


PS 93(5.1)
Real Estate Conveyance Tax
Limited Liability Companies
Replaces PS 93(5), issued: 12/27/93
Issued: 5/19/95